Table of Contents










Unit Plans and Ideas


A place to find out what everyone else has been planning and creating. Feel free to check out the other grades for some inspiration!


GAME ON!


Essential Questions

What is the influence of games on past and present cultures?
What do people learn when playing games?
What is an avatar, where, when, how and why are they (and how should they be) used?
What is the psychology surrounding avatars?
What are the decisions game designers must make prior to designing a game?


Students Will Know

• Risks and rewards of using avatars, as well as where, when, why, how they are used and how to use them appropriately
• Risks and rewards of modern gaming, as well as potential ethical questions surrounding modern gaming (re: product placement, violence, etc.)
• The elements of good game design and how these principles apply to other projects
• The incentives game designers use to lure players to keep playing
• What different age groups learn through games
• How games influence a culture


Students Will Be Able To:

• Design tactile and electronic games, anticipating user’s needs, ability levels, and moves
• Create multiple outcomes depending on users’ choices
• Design and use avatars in ways appropriate to a given situation
• Analyze the impact of games on cultures throughout history
• Discuss the pros and cons of modern gaming
• Play and evaluate one another’s games

Content Standards

Visual and Performing Arts:
• All students will understand and analyze the role, development, and continuing influence of the arts in relation to world cultures, history, and society.
Language Arts:
• All students will write in clear, concise, organized language that varies in content and form for different audiences and purposes.
• All students will speak in clear, concise, organized language that varies in content and form for different audiences and purposes.
• All students will listen actively to information from a variety of sources in a variety of situations.
• All students will access, view, evaluate, and respond to print, nonprint, and electronic texts and resources.
Social Studies:
• All students will utilize historical thinking, problem solving, and research skills to maximize their understanding of civics, history, geography, and economics.
• All students will demonstrate knowledge of world history in order to understand life and events in the past and how they relate to the present and the future.
Technological Literacy:
• All students will use computer applications to gather and organize information and to solve problems.
• All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, and the designed world as they relate to the individual, society, and the environment.


Performance Tasks

• Avatar design and analysis
• Game design plan
• Game (board, word, and/or electronic)
• Cultural and educational analysis of games throughout time/place
• Timeline of games
• Prediction of future games
• Game debate
• Forum posts


Learning Plan

Students will use current events for a given time period and place to analyze the influence the events may have had on gaming of that era/culture. They will create a timeline of gaming that ties significant cultural and historical causes to the effects on gameplay. Then, they will analyze modern games (board, word, and electronic) to study what different age groups can potentially learn from games. We will define and discuss the uses of avatars in a variety of genres, evaluating the pros and cons of using them and ultimately creating one that is a purposeful representation of an individual. We will conduct a class debate on the potential dangers of modern gaming with regard to advertising, violence, and the desensitization that occurs. As a final project, students will work in small groups to design a game for a specific age group and with multiple potential outcomes.



FOOD WARS


Stage 1 – Desired Results

Essential Questions:

• What is the impact of food availability, production, and consumption on an individual, a locality, and a society?
• Why are there chemicals and packaging in my food? What are the effects of these on my body and the environment?
• How can I improve my health and the environment with the food I consume?
• How are foods marketed?

Students Will Know:

• That the availability of food is a direct cause of the growth of any society, be it animal, human, or germ!
• Why different societies (ancient and modern) and individuals consume different foods
• The kinds of chemicals and packaging that go into foods and their uses and effects
• How food production and consumption affect the environment
• What can be done on an individual and cultural level to improve overall health for all
• How businesses get people to buy new foods or more of an existing food

Students Will Be Able To:

• Analyze the effects of food production and availability on individuals and societies in both modern and ancient times
• Examine and compare different societies in terms of food availability
• Evaluate the effects of the food they eat on their own health, the health of those around them, and the environment
• Analyze how changes in food consumption affect an individual, a food company, agribusiness, a society, and the environment
• Implement changes to their own diets and the diets of those around them to positively impact overall health

Content Standards:

Science:
• Evaluate strengths/weaknesses of data, claims, and arguments
• Communicate experimental findings to others
Social Studies:
• Analyze how events are related over time
• Use critical thinking to interpret events, recognize bias, pov and content
• Assess the credibility of primary and secondary sources
• Analyze data in order to see persons and events in context
• Examine current issues, events, or themes and relate them to past events
• Formulate questions based on information needs
• Use effective strategies for locating information
• Summarize information in written, graphic and oral forms
Math:
• Pose and solve problems
• Describe these situations mathematically
• Formulate appropriate mathematical questions
• Use a variety of strategies to find solutions
• Communicate mathematical ideas in oral and written form with a variety of audience
• Connect school math to daily life
• Evaluate situations, select problem-solving strategies, draw logical conclusions, develop and describe solutions, and recognize how those solutions can be applied
• Use multiple representations
Language Arts:
• Write for different purposes and audiences
• Gather, select and organize information appropriate to a topic, task, and audience
• Write reports based on research with a scope narrow enough to be thoroughly covered, supporting main ideas with facts, examples, and explanations from authoritative sources, including a works consulted page
• Write business letters in correct format and coherent style
• Use a variety of strategies to organize writing
• Use relevant graphics in writing

Performance Tasks:

• Individual food journal
• Food survey
• Interview with food professionals/preparers/buyers
• Comparison chart
• Graph tracing food availability, consumption, cultural/environmental impact
• Food timeline
• Oral presentation
• Reaction paper
• Advertisement (billboard, radio, print, electronic, tv, etc.)
• Prediction
• Research paper

Stage 3 – Learning Plan

Using excerpts from the book and movie Fast Food Nation and the book Salt, as well as previously learned historical, scientific, and mathematical concepts, students will explore and compile data regarding the impact of food on individuals, societies, and the environment in both modern and ancient times.
Students will choose or be assigned a food and trace its evolution, availability, consumption, and environmental/cultural/social impact. Using this data, as well as their own experiences and secondary sources, students will draft a research paper. This paper will include various graphic representations such as graphs and timelines. Students will take the information they compiled and transform their research paper into an oral presentation. The audience for the oral presentation will write a reaction paper to the information they heard in the presentation.
The second phase of this unit will ask students to predict how the food they eat impacts their overall health. For this part, students will maintain a food journal, take food surveys and meet with or listen to interviews with food professionals, preparers, and buyers. They will use this information to create a public service advertisement that either persuades or dissuades others to consume a certain food that was prominent from their food journals.


OFF THE GRID


Essential Questions

What does it mean to be off the grid?
What is the appeal of living off the grid, who does it and why?
What skills and knowledge do I need to be off the grid?
What are the risks and rewards of living off the grid?
How can I incorporate some of the advantages of being off the grid into my life?

Students Will Know

• What living off the grid requires
• The appeal of living off the grid, as well as the challenges
• What inspires people to live off the grid
• The value of living in closer proximity to nature in its purest state
• What humans gain from living in communities and what they lose

Students Will Be Able To

• Outline the major points of being off the grid
• Debate the pros and cons of being off the grid
• Tag online resources to help incorporate elements of the gridless lifestyle
• Quantify the fiscal impact of being off the grid in an individual and larger context
• Evaluate the risks and rewards of humans disconnecting from their environment
• Explain the value of being closer to nature
• Compare various geographic regions with regard to the challenges they present to the gridless lifestyle
• Explore meaningful ways to connect personally with their natural world
• Design an off the grid residence and community
• Incorporate lessons learned from GAME ON into a game based on living off the grid

Content Standards


Mathematics:
• All students will develop number sense and will perform standard numerical operations and estimations on all types of numbers in a variety of ways.
• All students will develop spatial sense and the ability to use geometric properties, relationships, and measurement to model, describe and analyze phenomena.
• All students will develop an understanding of the concepts and techniques of data analysis, probability, and discrete mathematics, and will use them to model situations, solve problems, and analyze and draw appropriate inferences from data.
• All students will use mathematical processes of problem solving, communication, connections, reasoning, representations, and technology to solve problems and communicate mathematical ideas.
Science:
• All students will develop problem-solving, decision-making and inquiry skills, reflected by formulating usable questions and hypotheses, planning experiments, conducting systematic observations, interpreting and analyzing data, drawing conclusions, and communicating results.
• All students will understand the interrelationships between science and technology and develop a conceptual understanding of the nature and process of technology.
• All students will gain an understanding of the structure, characteristics, and basic needs of organisms and will investigate the diversity of life.
• All students will gain an understanding of natural laws as they apply to motion, forces, and energy transformations.
• All students will gain an understanding of the structure, dynamics, and geophysical systems of the earth.
• All students will develop an understanding of the environment as a system of interdependent components affected by human activity and natural phenomena.
Social Studies:
• All students will apply knowledge of spatial relationships and other geographic skills to understand human behavior in relation to the physical and cultural environment.
Technological Literacy:
• All students will use computer applications to gather and organize information and to solve problems.
• All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, and the designed world as they relate to the individual, society, and the environment.

Performance Tasks

• Debate
• Off the grid summary
• Online tags for class database
• Spreadsheets for on and off the grid
• Multimedia ads and PSAs
• Off the grid residence and community design
• Off the grid game
• Forum posts

Learning Plan

Using authentic examples (maybe I can track down someone who actually lives off the grid), students will explore the reasons why people choose to live off the grid, how they shrug off their reliance on public utilities and other resources, and what they need to create a gridless lifestyle. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages to living this way, in both a philosophical and financial context. Following our exploration, students will attempt to incorporate some elements of the gridless lifestyle into their daily lives, at minimum decreasing their reliance, even slightly, on the grid. Using what they’ve learned, as well as what they have come to believe about living off the grid, students will design individual residences (use the Tiny Houses article/video from NYT) and communities that exemplify the gridless lifestyle. In delving into this topic, students will gain an understanding of what humans gain from living in the modern world, as well as what they lose.

THE OUTERNET – NO CHILD LEFT INSIDE

Essential Questions

What are the effects of movement on the brain and body?
What is physical fitness, how do I get it and keep it?
What factors have influenced today’s health issues?
How can we avoid/minimize a health crisis in the future?
What is the personal, community, and global impact of distancing ourselves from our natural environment?
What knowledge of the natural world is essential for the postmodern citizen?
How can I strengthen my connection to the environment?
What is a community garden, how can I start one, and what will it achieve?

Students Will Know

• The importance of physical activity and fitness as well as the effects of inactivity on the brain and body
• The causes and economic impact of our current health crisis and what can be done to stave it off for the future
• What has contributed to the developed world’s distance from nature and how this affects us individually and globally
• Critical information for understanding and protecting the natural world
• How they can strengthen their personal connection to the outdoors
• How to start a community garden and what it has done in other communities

Students Will be Able To

• Explore the nature of physical activity and how it affects the brain and body processes
• Analyze causes for the current health crisis
• Predict solutions for how to minimize/prevent a future health crisis
• Discuss the impact of development on human activity
• Survive and protect the natural world
• Enjoy and explore the outdoors in ways that are personally meaningful
• Research, plan, design, and create a community garden

Content Standards

Health and Physical Educations:
• All students will learn and apply health promotion concepts and skills to support a healthy, active lifestyle.
• All students will use health-enhancing personal, interpersonal, and life skills to support a healthy, active lifestyle.
• All students will apply health-related and skill-related fitness concepts and skills to develop and maintain a healthy, active lifestyle.
Language Arts:
• All students will understand and apply the knowledge of sounds, letters, and words in written English to become independent and fluent readers, and will read a variety of materials and texts with fluency and comprehension.
• All students will write in clear, concise, organized language that varies in content and form for different audiences and purposes.
• All students will speak in clear, concise, organized language that varies in content and form for different audiences and purposes.
Social Studies:

• All students will apply knowledge of spatial relationships and other geographic skills to understand human behavior in relation to the physical and cultural environment.
• All students will utilize historical thinking, problem solving, and research skills to maximize their understanding of civics, history, geography, and economics.
Technlogical Literacy:
• All students will use computer applications to gather and organize information and to solve problems.
• All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, and the designed world as they relate to the individual, society, and the environment.
Career Education and Consumer, Family and Life Skills
• All students will demonstrate critical life skills in order to be functional members of society.

Performance Tasks

• Activity log, analysis and timeline
• Class discussion and forum posts
• Socratic circle
• Personal Manifesto
• Survival skill handbook
• Community Garden plan, design, implementation

Learning Plan

In conjunction with knowledge students already have about the health, earth, life, and physical sciences, we will explore the impact of nature on humans with regard to the historical, current, and future indivudals and societies. Students will track their physical activity as well as log their physical and emotional states during these activities. We will explore the various outdoor skills needed to survive and students will create a handbook that reflects survival skills for a variety of locations. In addition to discussing the impact on individuals that development has had, we will explore ways to incorporate the natural world into our daily lives. Finally, we will look at community gardens, the role they have played in modern day, and how we can create one in Sparta.

Society and People

Identify specific societal issues in a variety of ways and demonstrate critical thinking skills through analyzing statistics, literature, news, etc.


Essential Questions:

How does society’s perception of beauty influence what is shown in the media?
How does the growing popularity of reality TV reflect on Society?
In what ways has media influenced you and society?
What do you think about the growing use and acceptance of cosmetic surgery?
Do you think today’s television programs and movies contain too much violence?
Should television, music, books, video games, etc., be censored? Why or why not?


Standards:

Science: Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of data, claims, and arguments.
Communicate experimental findings to others.
Social Studies: Use critical thinking skills to interpret events, recognize bias, point of view and content.
Examine current issues, events, or themes and relate them to past events.
Math: With the development of mathematical reasoning, students recognize that mathematics makes sense and can be understood. They learn low to evaluate situations, select problem-solving strategies, draw conclusions, develop and describe solutions, and recognize how those solutions can be applied.
Language Arts: Write for different purposes. Gather select and organize information appropriate to a topic, task, and audience.
End Product: Create a magazine


Topics to include:

• Career Women vs. Housewives
• Beauty
• Racism and Discrimination
• Technology effects on children
• Music lyrics effect on children
• Political Issues
• Environmental issues
• Technological effects on society

Activities

How can students represent mathematical situations through text?
How can students analyze information, draw upon their own conclusions, and demonstrate that knowledge through a visual or audio representation?

• Political cartoons
• Mathematical representations of research based on statistics
• Pie charts
• Surveys
• Visual representations of an issue
• Articles based on issues
• Advertisements
• Debate (Formal/Informal)
• How can students represent mathematical situations through text?
• How can students analyze information, draw upon their own conclusions, and demonstrate that knowledge through a visual or audio representation?


Related Questions:

How does the growing popularity of reality TV reflect on Society?
In what ways has media influenced you and society?
What do you think about the growing use and acceptance of cosmetic surgery?
Do you think today’s television programs and movies contain too much violence?
Should television, music, books, video games, etc., be censored? Why or why not?


Outcomes:

On-line Magazine
Newspaper
Website


The Fame Game


Essential Questions:

• How do people go from being unknown to famous?
• What is the difference between fame and stardom?
-What are the advantages and disadvantages to fame, and how has it changed in recent years?
• What kinds of opportunities are there to promote new talent?
• How do managers earn money?

Students Will Know:

• The difference between fame and stardom
• The various promotional opportunities that exist for new talent
• The kinds of jobs talent can get
• How much different jobs pay
• What a talent manager/agent does
• How to mass market talent

Students Will Be Able To:

• Create and market a fictional client
• Create and write job postings for potential jobs
• Create a media buzz
• Calculate a percentage
• Select the best person for a given job
-Extrapolate the effects of fame on an individual
-Use specific examples of the positive and negative effects of fame


Content Standards:

Social Studies:
• Analyze how events are related over time
• Use critical thinking to interpret events, recognize bias, pov and content
• Analyze data in order to see persons and events in context
• Summarize information in written, graphic and oral forms
Math:
• Pose and solve problems, describe these situations mathematically, formulate appropriate mathematical questions, and use a variety of strategies to find solutions
• Communicate mathematical ideas in oral and written form to a variety of audiences
• Connect school math to daily life
• Evaluate situations, select problem-solving strategies, draw logical conclusions, develop and describe solutions, and recognize how those solutions can be applied
• Use multiple representations
Language Arts:
• Write for different purposes and audiences
• Gather, select and organize information appropriate to a topic, task, and audience
• Use a variety of strategies to organize writing
• Demonstrate the ability to write business letters in correct format and coherent style
• Demonstrate the development of a personal style and voice in writing
• Use relevant graphics in writing

Performance Tasks:

• Client portfolio with narrative bio and photo
• Promotion plan
• Job postings
• Business letter with contract details
• Visual representations of fees
• Schedule

Stage 3 – Learning Plan

Students will play two parts: talent manager and hiring manager. For the first part, students will create a fictional client, including background and other information. They will then “market” this client for potential jobs. This is when they will alternate playing the role of manager and customer. Students will introduce their clients to the rest of the class in a version of a status meeting. Students will brainstorm and create promotional opportunities that take their creative talent client from unknown to working or even famous. For each “job” that a client is hired for, the manager will have to calculate his/her cut. A competition for the highest earning manager will be included. Students will negotiate contract details by writing business letters, and they will also present graphs or charts that illustrate their income from jobs and management fees. Finally, students will create a mock schedule for their client.


TREASURE HUNTERS


Essential Questions

What do people treasure and why?
How and why has what we value changed over time?
Where can we find treasures of the past and present?
What may we treasure in the future and why?
What is the value of today’s treasures?
Where can I find treasure?

Students Will Know

• The factors that have influenced what individuals and societies have valued throughout history and in the present day
• What they value on an individual level now, as well as what they may value in the future
• What their community should value and how to move in that direction
• The financial and relative value of a variety of treasures
• Where to find treasure

Students Will Be Able To

• Discuss the meaning of relative value
• Compare what various societies treasure now with the past
• Analyze the factors that influence what a society and person value
• Identify various geographical regions and the treasures they contain
• Predict what cultures may value in the future based on various factors
• Decide what they value as an individual, as well as what their community and society should value and why
• Behave in a way that aims to increase their access to what they value on an individual level
• Construct a plan for finding treasure
• Critique masterpieces in a variety of genres (art, music, dance, theater, textiles, jewelry, fashion, food, architecture, etc.)

Content Standards


Visual and Performing Arts:
• All students will use aesthetic knowledge in the creation of and in response to dance, music, theater, and visual art.
• All students will develop, apply and reflect upon knowledge of the process of critique.
• All students will understand and analyze the role, development, and continuing influence of the arts in relation to world cultures, history, and society.
Language Arts:
• All students will write in clear, concise, organized language that varies in content and form for different audiences and purposes.
• All students will listen actively to information from a variety of sources in a variety of situations.
• All students will access, view, evaluate, and respond to print, nonprint, and electronic texts and resources.
Mathematics:
• All students will develop number sense and will perform standard numerical operations and estimations on all types of numbers in a variety of ways.
• All students will develop an understanding of the concepts and techniques of data analysis, probability, and discrete mathematics, and will use them to model situations, solve problems, and analyze and draw appropriate inferences from data.
• All students will use mathematical processes of problem solving, communication, connections, reasoning, representations, and technology to solve problems and communicate mathematical ideas.
Social Studies:
• All students will demonstrate knowledge of world history in order to understand life and events in the past and how they relate to the present and the future.
• All students will demonstrate knowledge of United States and New Jersey history in order to understand life and events in the past and how they relate to the present and future.
• All students will acquire an understanding of key economic principles.
• All students will apply knowledge of spatial relationships and other geographic skills to understand human behavior in relation to the physical and cultural environment.
Technological Literacy:
• All students will use computer applications to gather and organize information and to solve problems.
• All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, and the designed world as they relate to the individual, society, and the environment.

Performance Tasks

• One red paper clip activity, analysis and presentation
• What I Value Video
• Analysis and evidence of personal and cultural values
• Treasure plan
• Treasure map
• Community plan (town committees?)
• Masterpiece crtiique

Learning Plan

Using what they have learned about ancient civilizations, as well as what contemporary society values, students will explore the nature of value, both real and relative. We will conduct the one red paper clip activity to explore the nature of relative value, and students will present their experiences as well as analyze the value of what their peers traded. We will look at our own lives to find evidence of what we value, and then look at our community and our society to uncover what they value. Once we realize that what we say we value as a society is incongruous with what the evidence shows, we will design plans for increasing personal access to valuable treasures. We will look at how different cultures value different things based on history, geography and other factors. We will use scientific, historical, economic, and cultural data to attempt to predict what may be valuable in the future. We will look at treasures throughout history and attempt to assign real value to them, using methods of critique that are both subjective and objective. Finally, each student will choose one thing they value and construct a plan for finding and keeping their treasure.


Question Authority: Media Literacy


Stage 1 – Desired Results


Essential Questions:

• How can I differentiate between fact and opinion?
• How can I identify the underlying messages in mainstream media?
• How do these messages affect what and how I think, act, and believe?
• How do different mediums differ?
• How can I use media to express my own thoughts and beliefs?
• Can media change the world?


Students Will Know:

• The various types of media
- The role of media in our society
• How media has been exploited
• That the underlying messages in media are subtle and aimed at specific ends
• That they must be vigilant and academically skeptical about media messages
• That the media can be a powerful tool
• Where social responsibility fits into media
• The role of objectivity in reporting


Students Will Be Able To:

• Quickly and decisively differentiate between fact and opinion
• Use facts to support their own opinions
• Identify a variety of persuasive strategies in media
• Analyze the ways in which media aims at kids and teens
• Use persuasive techniques to express an opinion
• Use media in a socially responsible manner
• Use the same data to express two opposing views


Content Standards:

Science:
• Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of data, claims, and arguments
• Communicate experimental findings to others
• Recognize that curiosity, skepticism, open-mindedness, and honesty are attributes of scientists
Social Studies:
• Analyze how events are related over time
• Use critical thinking to interpret events, recognize bias, pov and content
• Assess the credibility of primary and secondary sources
• Analyze data in order to see persons and events in context
• Examine current issues, events, or themes and relate them to past events
• Use effective strategies for locating information
• Compare and contrast competing interpretations of current and historical events
• Distinguish fact from fiction by comparing sources about figures and events with characters and events
• Summarize information in written, graphic and oral forms
Math:
• Communicate mathematical ideas in oral and written form to a variety of audiences
• Connect school math to daily life
• Evaluate situations, select problem-solving strategies, draw logical conclusions, develop and describe solutions, and recognize how those solutions can be applied
• Use multiple representations
Language Arts:
• Write for different purposes and audiences
• Gather, select and organize information appropriate to a topic, task, and audience
• Develop and use a variety of genres
• Demonstrate the ability to write business letters in correct format and coherent style
• Use a variety of strategies to organize writing
• Use relevant graphics in writing

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence


Performance Tasks:

• Webquest
• Media analysis – narrative + visuals
• Public service advertisement – any medium, any topic
• Seeing both sides – evaluate statistics from opposing points of view – DBQ
• Reaction paper
• Fact and opinion exercises
• Headline study
• Letter to the editor

Stage 3 – Learning Plan

Students will first read differing accounts of the same news story, identify the differences and analyze why there are differences. This will introduce them to the idea that objectivity is subjective. They will view, read, and listen to a variety of media. They will evaluate the overt and subtle messages being presented, as well as the methods of presentation. An exploration of persuasive techniques and their appropriate uses will follow. Students will compile and share newspaper headlines, analyzing if and how they are biased. They will complete and create exercises to practice quickly differentiating fact from opinion. They will gradually use facts to support their own opinions, both orally and in writing, in both short and long writing pieces. An investigation into how commercial and noncommercial media has been exploited throughout history will lead students to a deeper understanding of the importance of skepticism. Objectivity’s role in media will be discussed. Students ultimately will capitalize on the power of media to publicize a socially responsible message.


Hunting for Cool


Stage 1 – Desired Results


Essential Questions:

• What is the difference between a trend and a fad?
• How do trends and fads become popularized?
• How do fads vary with time and location?
• In what contexts do trends and fads exist?
• How can I start a fad?
• What factors will influence whether my fad becomes a trend?


Students Will Know:

• How and why fads and trends get established
• Where different trends and fads begin and how they evolve
• Current trends and fads in various locations and in various social contexts (parenting, fashion, business, education, interpersonal relationships)
• Specific fads that became trends
• Why some fads become trends while others fade or reappear in a different context
• What “mainstream” means and how to tell if something is mainstream


Students Will Be Able To:

• Differentiate between trends and fads
• Analyze and compare the backgrounds of fads and trends in various time periods and locations
• Create and popularize a fad
• Evaluate the factors that make some fads (including their own) become trends
• Conceive the potential results of a fad in an individual, local, and global context


Content Standards:

Science:
• Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of data, claims, and arguments
• Communicate experimental findings to others
Social Studies:
• Analyze how events are related over time
• Use critical thinking to interpret events
• Analyze data in order to see persons and events in context
• Examine current issues, events, or themes and relate them to past events
• Formulate questions based on information needs
• Use effective strategies for locating information
• Summarize information in written, graphic, and oral forms
Math:
• Pose and solve problems
• Communicate mathematical ideas in oral and written form to classmates, teachers, and parents
• Connect school math to daily life
• Evaluate situations, select problem-solving strategies and draw logical conclusions
• Use various representations to communicate thinking
Language Arts:
• Write for different purposes and audiences
• Gather, select, and organize information appropriate to a topic, task, and audience
• Write reports based on research witha scope narrow enough to be thoroughly covered, supporting the main ideas with facts and examples from authoritative sources
• Use a variety of strategies to organize writing
• Demonstate higher-order thinking skills
• Use relevant graphics in writing

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence


Performance Tasks:

• Extemporaneous speech
• Fad list
• Profile of a fad
• Eulogy of a fad
• Fad comparisons
• Cause/effect flow chart
• Fad proposal
• Trend analysis
• Fad photostory
• Survey

Stage 3 – Learning Plan

Students will begin by developing an understanding of fads and trends, their purposes and impacts on individuals, communities, and history. Once they have secured an understanding of the difference between fads and trends, they will spontaneously list as many fads as they can, compare their lists, and identify which, if any, might be trends. They will discuss and analyze how they can differentiate between fads and trends. They will use a variety of contexts to deepen their understanding of fads and trends, including science, technology, parenting, relationships, business, medicine, fashion, and education. They will research a variety of fads and attempt to trace them back to their roots. They will create a cause/effect flow chart of at least one fad’s roots. They will compare fads and trends across time and location. They will individually and jointly profile fads and present evidence of a specific trend. They will discover fads that have “passed on” and eulogize at least one. They will create their own fads and a plan for how to popularize and mainstream their fad. They will use Photostory to present their plan. Finally, students will use a survey to quantify if and how much their fad has taken hold.



Disconnected – I text, therefore I am


Stage 1 – Desired Results


Essential Questions:

• How have humans communicated throughout history?
• How and why is communication different throughout the world?
• What is the impact of human communication on a given society?
• What are the benefits and drawbacks to different forms of communication?
• What might human communication be like in the future and what factors will influence these trends?


Students Will Know:

• The different forms of communication from the beginning of time
• How different cultures throughout the world communicate
• What form of communication is appropriate for a given message
• The etiquette for different kinds of communication
• What has influenced communication in the past


Students Will Be Able To:

• Trace the evolution of human communication
• Classify the types and uses of communication
• Compare human communication in different parts of the world and in different time periods
• Roleplay and use appropriate etiquette for a given form of communication
• Use various communication tools in clear, concise, effective ways
• Predict what might influence trends in human communication and how it may change in the future

Content Standards:
Science:
• Communicate experimental findings to others
• Recognize that the results of scientific investigations are seldom exact and that replication is often necessary
• Recognize that curiosity, skepticism, open-mindedness, and honesty are attributes of scientists
Social Studies:
• Analyze how events are related over time
• Use critical thinking to interpret events, recognize bias, pov and content
• Analyze data in order to see persons and events in context
• Examine current issues, events, or themes and relate them to past events
• Formulate questions based on information needs
• Use effective strategies for locating information
• Compare and contrast competing interpretations of current and historical events
• Interpret events considering continuity and change
• Summarize information in written, graphic and oral forms
Math:
• Pose and solve problems, describe these situations mathematically, formulate appropriate mathematical questions, and use a variety of strategies to find solutions
• Communicate mathematical ideas in oral and written form to a variety of audiences
• Connect school math to daily life
• Evaluate situations, select problem-solving strategies, draw logical conclusions, develop and describe solutions, and recognize how those solutions can be applied
• Use multiple representations
Language Arts:
• Write for different purposes and audiences
• Gather, select and organize information appropriate to a topic, task, and audience
• Write reports based on research with a scope narrow enough to be thoroughly covered, supporting main ideas with facts, examples, and explanations from authoritative sources
• Use a variety of strategies to organize writing
• Use relevant graphics in writing
• Demonstrate the development of a personal style and voice in writing

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence


Performance Tasks:

• Global classroom exchange
• Communication roleplaying skit
• Timeline
• Comparison chart
• Questionnaire or survey
• News story
• Discussion panel
• Text messages

Stage 3 – Learning Plan

Students will begin with an analysis of how humans currently communicate, both locally and globally. They will use questionnaires and surveys to gather data about the communication habits of their local and global peers. We will work backward, compiling, discussing, and comparing information about how humans communicate throughout the world, currently and throughout history, locally and throughout the world. We will explore proper etiquette for the different types of communication (i.e., don’t ask for a job interview or a divorce via text message). Students will evaluate the impact of technology and other trends on communication. Students will also practice sending clear, concise text messages while still maintaining their writer’s voice. Ultimately, students will use all of the information, discussions, and data they have put together to present their predictions for how human communication will evolve.

Past, Present and Future

Identify and analyze how technological use has changed cars, buildings, etc.
Analyze a variety of uses for technology and how it can be used to demonstrate a variety of uses across the content areas.
Science: Communicate experimental findings to others.
Social Studies: Analyze how events are related over time.
Math: Problem posing and problem solving involve examining situations that arise in mathematics and other disciplines and in common experiences, describing these situations mathematically, formulating appropriate mathematical questions, and using a variety of strategies to find solutions.
Language Arts: Gather, select, and organize information appropriate to a topic, task, and audience.

Essential Questions:

How has technology affected your generation compared to previous generations?
How has technology impacted buildings, cars, fashion design, etc.?
Predict how technology will change the future.

Topics:
Cars
Buildings
Homes
Fashion Design
Print (Magazines, Newspapers, etc.)

Outcome: Design a product that represents how technology has changed from the past to the future. Such products may consist of building a model, interview, etc.


Empire Builders

Stage 1 – Desired Results


Essential Questions:

  • How have human communities evolved over time?
  • How can a society be judged (progress, happiness, affluence, etc.)?
  • What is the goal of a society/culture?
  • What kinds of things influence the way a society evolves?
  • How do different kinds of leadership impact a society?
  • What is the difference between society and culture?


Students Will Know:

  • The difference between egalitarian, class-based, and ranked societies
  • The difference between society and culture
  • What kinds of things influence the way a society evolves
  • What caused the destruction of some past societies
  • The spectrum of criteria they can use to evaluate a society


Students Will Be Able To:

  • Give examples of each of the three types of societies
  • Compare the similarities and differences between different types of societies
  • Analyze and evaluate the impact of various influences on a society
  • Determine the conditions for evaluating a society
  • Apply these conditions to various societies throughout time and the world
  • Predict the kinds of society that might flourish in the future

Content Standards:
Science:
· Communicate experimental findings to others
Social Studies:
· Analyze how events are related over time
· Use critical thinking to interpret events, recognize bias, pov and content
· Analyze data in order to see persons and events in context
· Examine current issues, events, or themes and relate them to past events
· Formulate questions based on information needs
· Use effective strategies for locating information
· Compare and contrast competing interpretations of current and historical events
· Interpret events considering continuity and change
· Summarize information in written, graphic and oral forms
Math:
· Connect school math to daily life
· Evaluate situations, select problem-solving strategies, draw logical conclusions, develop and describe solutions, and recognize how those solutions can be applied
· Use multiple representations
Language Arts:
· Write for different purposes and audiences
· Gather, select and organize information appropriate to a topic, task, and audience
· Use a variety of strategies to organize writing
· Use relevant graphics in writing
· Demonstrate the development of a personal style and voice in writing

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence


Performance Tasks:

  • List of societies and their characteristics
  • Matrix of contemporary American society
  • Comparison charts
  • Narrative to accompany comparison charts
  • Culture of SMS descriptive essay or instructional guide
  • Poem or song
  • Collage, diorama or other visual representation of daily life in their society
  • Powerpoint or Photostory presentation
  • Day in the life - Story
  • Collaboration
Stage 3 – Learning Plan

In this unit, students will first review some of the knowledge they learned in previous years about ancient civilizations. We will take these societies to the present day and compare the way they were to the way there are now. For those societies that no longer exist, we will explore the factors that led to their destructions. Students will then create their own societies, determining the systems of government, commerce, culture and other social factors that they will utilize. They will create a visual representation of daily life in their societies, write in various formats about their society, and predict how their society might evolve. Creating the societies may be a small group task.


Traveling around the world

Stage 1 – desired results

Essential questions:

  1. How do people use statistics in the real world?
  2. How much money does it take to travel for two weeks?
  3. What are some of the difficulties that come into play when traveling to other countries and how you can overcome those difficulties?
  4. How important is management and scheduling when traveling?

Students will know:

  1. That statistics are useful to help decide where and when you travel.
  2. Travel can be a very expensive experience.
  3. Money is different in various parts of the world and that US money must be converted and may not be worth as much in other countries.
  4. Traveling can sometimes involve obstacles and there are ways to overcome those obstacles.
  5. Time management is important when creating any kind of schedule.

Students will be able to:

  1. Compile, interpret, compare, understand, and use statistics involving weather and rate of travel.
  2. Understand and use the exchange rate of money to plan a successful trip.
  3. Take real life situations that can become difficult and adapt to overcome those problems.
  4. Use plane schedules, hotel reservations, dining experiences, excursions, etc. to create a travel agenda that meets the time and money requirements allotted for the trip. Students should not go over the trip budget.

Content Standards

  1. Problem solving – involving examining situations that arise in mathematics and other disciplines.
  2. Write for different purposes and a variety of audiences.
  3. Gather, select, and organize information appropriate to a topic, task, and audience.
  4. Analyze data

Stage 2 – Assessment evidence

Performance Tasks
v Travel Journal
v Graph of weather activity
v Money conversion chart
v Travel agenda
v Flight and hotel information schedule
v Spreadsheet of budget and money spent, saved, and money left over
v Written reflection on experience

Stage 3 – Learning Plan

Students will plan a trip to (country of their choice?) or somewhere they have studied in the past. They will be given $5,000 and two weeks to be on this trip. After researching the statistics regarding weather in these areas students will decide where and when they would like to travel. They will also have to find out what kind of money is used in their travel destination and how the U.S. dollar would be converted into that money and what it would be worth. Students will have to research flight schedules, hotel prices and availability, excursion ideas, restaurant choices and prices. With this information students will then create a travel agenda mapping out their trip and calculating all the money they will spend on the trip. As a final product students will be creating a chart to show why they chose this destination and time of year based on the weather statistics that were found. They will also include a money conversion chart showing the change in currency. Finally students will submit their travel agenda and travel journal. Students may also include pictures and facts about countries they are visiting.


What’s New? Weekly current events Blog

Students will be able to:

  1. Read and think about current events and offer personal comments on those events.
  2. Respond to the comments of their peers.

Content Standards:

  1. Use critical thinking skills to interpret events, recognize bias, point of view and content.
  2. Examine current issues, events, or themes and relate them to past or other present events.
  3. Interpret events considering continuity and change, the role of chance oversight, and changing.
  4. Organize a response that develops insight into literature by exploring personal reactions, connecting to personal experiences, and referring to text through sustained use of examples.

Performance Tasks
- This will be a weekly task that students are responsible for.
- Using a blogging website such as google blogger, 21 classes, etc, that is set up by the teacher the students will be required to go onto the blogging website the respond twice weekly to the current events topic that was posted by the teacher for that week.
- The student’s first response must be to the topic that was posted. They will be giving their opinion, posing a question, or recording a reaction.
- The student’s second response must be a reaction, response or question to one of the responses of their peers.
- Students may go on and respond more than twice but they must respond at least twice each week.
- This will enable students to use technology to analyze interesting current events.



Response and Discussion Journals

Students will be able to:

  1. Read and think about current events and offer personal comments on those events.
  2. Use their journal entries to help them form discussions on the topics.

Content Standards:

  1. Use critical thinking skills to interpret events, recognize bias, point of view and content.
  2. Examine current issues, events, or themes and relate them to past or other present events.
  3. Interpret events considering continuity and change, the role of chance oversight, and changing.
  4. Organize a response that develops insight into literature by exploring personal reactions, connecting to personal experiences, and referring to text through sustained use of examples.

Performance Tasks
- This task can be done weekly, bi-monthly, or whenever something comes up.
- Students will take 5-10 minutes to respond to a topic that is written on the board by the teacher.
- This topic can be a piece of current events, a controversial issue, a question, a song lyric, etc.
- After students respond in their journals to this topic they will use what they have written to help fuel their discussion.
- The class will then have a discussion on this topic and students will be allowed to voice their opinions.
- It’s possible to even have a mini debate.


Music and Culture
Standards:
Social Studies: Analyze how events are related over time.
Use critical thinking skills to interpret events, recognize bias, point of view content.
Interpret events considering continuity and change, the role of chance oversight and changing.
Language Arts: Gather, select, and organize information appropriate to a topic, task, and audience.
Organize a response that develops insight into literature by exploring personal reactions, connecting to personal experiences, and referring to the text through sustained use of examples.
Students will understand:
The role music plays in influencing culture.
Essential Questions:
How does music influence culture?
How does music influence each generation?
What can you learn about a culture listening to music?
Students will be able to:
Identify how music influences culture and each generation.
Identify how students can learn about culture based on listening to music.
Create a story using video, music CD’s, etc., which represents past generations of cultures and generations to come.
Description of unit:
In this unit students will research and identify how music has represented each generation. Based on their research, students will identify specific attitudes, fashion, politics, that correlate with the generation. As a result of their research, students will create a product that represents the music and culture of past, current, and future generations.
Possible Outcomes:
Photo story
Garage Band
Music video


Author Bios
Overview:
-This can be used and altered for various situations and goals,
-First I would take pictures of each of my students and get them printed.
-Then the students would use novels to examine the author bios in the back of each book. We discussed why author bios were important and what their purpose is.
-Students then type their own author bio and print it out.
-The bios are attached to their pictures and displayed in the room.
-They can then be used to identify the author of writing that is displayed around the room.
-The goal is for students to feel and believe that they are actually authors and their writing matters and will be published.


Entitlement Generation:
Students will be able to:
Identify and research the names of past generations and why each generation was identified with that name.
Represent their knowledge of past and present generations through developing a product using technology.
Predict the future generations’ title and represent the changes through developing a product.

Essential Questions:
Why do you think your generation is called the “Entitlement Generation”?
How can you prove or discredit this title?
What were the titles of previous generations?
What was the criterion to form such names?
Predict what the future generations will be titled. How did you formulate such a title? What criteria and information did you base your prediction on?
Compare your generation to your parents’ generation.

Standards:
Science: Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of data, claims, and arguments.

Social Studies: Examine current issues, events, or themes and relate them to past events.
Analyze how events are related over time.
Assess the credibility of primary and secondary sources.

Language Arts : Gather, select, and organize information appropriate to a topic, task, and audience.
Organize a response that develops insight into literature by exploring personal reactions, connecting to personal experiences, and referring to the text through sustained use of examples.

Description:
Students will begin the unit by discussing the title “Entitlement Generation”. Based on student observation, they will determine why they are given such a name. Students will continue their research through analyzing text, data, etc. representing the title. They will also research previous generations and why they were titled with that name. At the conclusion of the unit, students will be able to identify and explain the purpose of the past present and future generation titles.

Possible Outcomes:
Students will create a product that represents their knowledge of the “Entitlement Generation,” as well as past generations.
Role Play
Create a person online representing each a generation from the past, present, and future.


CASH CLIMBERS


Stage 1 – Desired Results


Essential Questions:

• How do people spend their money?
• What are the different ways in which money influences daily life?
• How can an average person increase his/her wealth?
• What is the role of the stock market in our economy?
• What are some current and future trends in the stock market?

Students Will Know:

• The various ways in which people in different economic segments spend, save, and attempt to increase their money
• The impact of money on the life of various societies throughout history and the world
• Why countries have stock exchanges
• The different forms of currency and rates of exchange across the world
• How the NYSE and other national exchanges work (general)
• What a market segment is
• How and by what the stock market is influenced

Students Will Be Able To:

• Read a stock report
• Differentiate between different market segments
• Predict a stock trend based on non-market factors
• Evaluate the pros and cons to different forms of investing
• Choose which stocks to buy and sell
• Calculate exchange rates

Content Standards:

Science:
• Evaluate strengths/weaknesses of data, claims, and arguments
• Communicate experimental findings to others

Social Studies:
• Analyze how events are related over time
• Use critical thinking to interpret events, recognize bias, pov and content
• Assess the credibility of primary and secondary sources
• Analyze data in order to see persons and events in context
• Examine current issues, events, or themes and relate them to past events
• Formulate questions based on information needs
• Use effective strategies for locating information
• Compare and contrast competing interpretations of current and historical events
• Distinguish fact from fiction by comparing sources about figures and events with characters and events
• Summarize information in written, graphic and oral forms

Math:
• Pose and solve problems
• Describe these situations mathematically
• Formulate appropriate mathematical questions
• Use a variety of strategies to find solutions
• Communicate mathematical ideas in oral and written form to a variety of audiences
• Connect school math to daily life
• Evaluate situations, select problem-solving strategies, draw logical conclusions, develop and describe solutions, and recognize how those solutions can be applied
• Use technology to solve mathematical problems

Language Arts:
• Write for different purposes and audiences
• Gather, select and organize information appropriate to a topic, task, and audience
• Write reports based on research with a scope narrow enough to be thoroughly covered, supporting main ideas with facts, examples, and explanations from authoritative sources, including a works consulted page
• Write business letters in correct format and coherent style
• Use a variety of strategies to organize writing
• Use relevant graphics in writing


Performance Tasks:

• Trend analysis – can refer to Cool Hunting lesson for this
• Analysis of influential factors on the market (general and specific)
• Pie chart of market segments
• Letter to shareholders
• News report (oral or written)
• Prediction narrative
• Risk analysis
• Summary of investments
• Exchange rate calculation tables

Stage 3 – Learning Plan
Students will learn the general history and operating procedures of the stock market, including key terms. We will explore the different segments of the marketplace, and the kinds of factors that influence a stock’s price and trading. We will open a class online account and determine, based on our analysis, what we should invest it. Students will have the choice of whether to leave their money “under the bed,” invest it in a short-term, fixed rate CD, or invest it in the stock market. They will then track their investments and analyze the factors that may be influencing their stocks. We will evaluate risks and returns on investments, trace the history of certain stocks and connect them to influential factors, deliver written and oral reports about the market, and make predictions about how certain stocks will perform.
As we move through this unit, we will also explore the role of the market in other countries, and discuss the impact of exchange rates on a country’s economy. Students will also practice calculating exchange rates.


Babies by Design

Stage 1 – desired results

Essential Questions

  1. What kind of impact could genetically engineered babies have on society?
  2. Would this process separate the rich from the poor and make the rich richer and the poor poorer?
  3. Is it ever a good idea to genetically engineer babies: either for disease control or to make a “super baby.”

Students will Know:

  1. Why some people and scientists might genetically engineer babies.
  2. The medical reasons for this procedure.
  3. Why some people might want to make super babies and how this will affect society.
  4. The specifics on how a baby is genetically engineered
  5. The positive and negative effects of genetically designed babies.

Students will be able to:

  1. Analyze the science of genetic engineering of babies and will form an opinion on whether they agree or disagree with the process
  2. Read and summarize various articles on the topic.
  3. Evaluate the effects that genetic engineering will have on our society.
  4. View videos on the topic to help them form opinions.
  5. Create a prediction on how the future will be if designer babies become the norm for people having children.

Content Standards:
Science:
-evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of data, claims and arguments.
-communicate findings to others.
-recognize that the results of scientific investigations are seldom exactly the same and that replication is often necessary.
-recognize that curiosity, skepticism, open-mindedness, and honesty are attributes of scientists.
-Summarize information in written, graphic and oral forms.

Social Studies:
-Examine current issues, events, or themes and relate them to past events.
-Formulate questions based on information needs.
-Use effective strategies for locating information.

Language Arts:
-write for different purposes
-gather, select, and organize information appropriate to a topic, task, and audience.
-Demonstrate the ability to write business letters in correct format and coherent style.
- Demonstrate higher-order thinking skills and writing clarity.

Stage 2 – Assessment evidence

Performance tasks:
- Journal reflections
- Picket signs
- Oral presentation
- Reaction paper
- Extemporaneous speeches
- Pro/con charts
- Comic strip (showing future)

Stage 3 – Learning plan

Using articles and videos from Time, CNN, and various other sources students will learn the process involved in making designer babies. Students will use these sources to formulate an opinion of the process and will respond in journal entries and reaction papers. Students could also voice their opinion through oral presentation or picket signs. In order to demonstrate what the future could be like with designer babies students could create a comic strip displaying what they foresee for the future. This unit is really about discussion and discovery of this scientific process and whether or not it should be done in certain circumstances. For example, is it okay to genetically engineer babies to try and delete a harmful gene or is it okay to genetically engineer babies to create a blonde haired, blue eyed, smart child?



Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder

Stage 1 – desired results

Essential Questions:

  1. How does society affect our perceptions of what is beautiful and what is not?
  2. Do you ever try to make your looks adhere to the “norm” or what is popular?
  3. Does the media ever portray and unrealistic portrait of beauty?
  4. What does “Beauty is in the eye of the Beholder” mean?
  5. What struggles do today’s teenagers face when it comes to beauty and perception?

Students will Know:

  1. How the media is usually portraying an unrealistic viewpoint of beauty.
  2. That their lives and viewpoints of themselves are affected by the media and what is considered to be beautiful.
  3. How the media goes about portraying unrealistic beauty.
  4. What their own perspective of beauty is.
  5. How the definition of beauty differs in various societies.

Students will be able to:

  1. Examine and compare different society’s viewpoints of beauty.
  2. Analyze how the media goes about warping the perception of “real” beauty.
  3. Reflect on their own perception of beauty.
  4. Come up with ways to change the media perception.

Content Standards:
Social Studies:
-Examine current issues, events, or themes and relate them to past events.
-Formulate questions based on information needs.
-Use effective strategies for locating information.

Language Arts:
-write for different purposes
-gather, select, and organize information appropriate to a topic, task, and audience.
-Demonstrate the ability to write business letters in correct format and coherent style.
- Demonstrate higher-order thinking skills and writing clarity.

Stage 2 – Assessment evidence

Performance tasks:
- Journaling
- Analyze magazines, videos, musicals (wicked) in order to find evidence of beauty.
- Analyze beauty in other cultures and compare it to our own. What makes something beautiful in another culture and why is something beautiful in our own culture.
- Research beauty in other cultures.
- Rant
- Analogies
- Visual representations


Stage 3 – Learning plan
Students will use various sources to examine what the public perception of beauty is like in our own society today. They will look at magazines, movies, celebrities, and athletes to determine what kind of beauty is glorified in our society. Students will also watch the “pigface” episode the The Twilight Zone to see that perception really depends on the society. We will also discuss the Magic Mirror complex where many people look in the mirror and see themselves as worse than they are or perhaps better than they are. Students will also research what beauty is in other cultures using online sites or cultural magazines. You tube has a variety of videos that show how television or print ads manipulate people’s looks. Students will journal on these topics, rant on them, create visual representations about beauty in other cultures, discuss how this affects them during their teenage years. Create a campaign to show teenagers how they are beautiful just the way they are to expose the media inaccuracies when portraying beauty.



Budget Bankers

Stage 1 – Desired results

Essential Questions:
1. How much money does the average family need per month to live comfortably?
2. How difficult is it to create and stick to a budget?
3. Why is it important to have a budget as an adult? A teenager?

Students will know:
1. The importance of having a budget.
2. How creating and sticking to a budget can be beneficial.
3. How to create a budget that fits their income and expenses.

Students will be able to:
1. Use excel to create a monthly budget for a family
2. Understand the process of creating and sticking to a budget.
3. Take a monthly salary and determine their needs as a family
4. Understand the difference between needing and wanting something
5. Use a checkbook and banking system.
6. Understand the repercussions of credit card debt.

Content Standards:
- Math:
• Pose and solve problems
• Describe these situations mathematically
• Formulate appropriate mathematical questions
• Use a variety of strategies to find solutions
• Communicate mathematical ideas in oral and written form with a variety of audience
• Connect school math to daily life
• Evaluate situations, select problem-solving strategies, draw logical conclusions, develop and describe solutions, and recognize how those solutions can be applied
• Use multiple representations
- Language Arts:
• Write for different purposes and audiences
• Gather, select and organize information appropriate to a topic, task, and audience
• Use a variety of strategies to organize writing
• Use relevant graphics in writing

Stage 2 – assessment evidence

Performance Tasks:
- Researching various items – rents, food prices, gas prices, etc.
- Creating a budget
- Journaling
- Oral presentation
- Graphing data
- Check writing and balancing
- Possible group work
- Reaction paper
- Lessons learned paper

Stage 3 – Learning Plan
After a discussion and possibly watching clips of what a budget is and why it’s important to stick one the students will be given a career, a take home salary, and a family. They must look into all the expenses it takes to have a family and using excel (or any other comparable program) create a monthly budget for that family. Students will then have to journal on what items a family “needs” vs. “wants.” They must also use a checkbook and balance it or use an online banking system. They will have to write a reaction paper that discusses the easy and hard things about having a budget and what they would do if an emergency happens. Students will also complete a paper outlining the lessons they’ve learned about the value of money. In the end they will present their process to the class and we will see if they were able to stick to the budget they were given and live comfortably.